TRS Chester

— the unofficial blog of Theology & Religious Studies, University of Chester


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Draft Subject Content for A-Level RS: A Response (Wendy Dossett)

Students in an exam hall.

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. This is the view of many teachers, examiners and text-book writers regarding the reform of the Religious Studies A-level curriculum. And they have a point. Never Continue reading

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Narrative & Reflexivity: A Roundtable

ChesterFollowing hot on the heels of the interview with Dr Alana Vincent which we pointed you towards yesterday, the folks at The Religious Studies Project have posted the video of a roundtable discussion which also took place the day that we hosted them here at Chester.

The subject of the discussion was Narrative and Reflexivity in the Study of Religion, and Christopher R. Cotter (chair) and Ethan Gjerset Quillen from TRSP were joined by Continue reading


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Reflections: The Morning After (Wendy Dossett)

Bayer_Heroin_bottleThe morning after a vibrant two-day event, delegates from the Recovery from Addiction: Bridging the Gap between Policy and Practice conference woke to the sad news that the initial inquest into Peaches Geldof’s death had revealed that heroin is likely to have played a role in her death. Social media, previously channelling devastation at the loss of this young celebrity, lit up with questions, many freighted with judgement. How could she use heroin when looking after her much-loved 11 month old son? Like Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Winehouse before her, how could someone so privileged and talented throw their life away so selfishly, and so stupidly? Without first-hand experience of the value-distortions of active addiction it is undoubtedly Continue reading


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Influential texts (Wendy Dossett)

Arthur, Chris, (1990) Biting the Bullet: Some personal reflections on Religious Education, Edinburgh: St Andrews Press

This collection of essays by Chris Arthur inspired me to think much more critically about the potential for positive and negative outcomes of different sorts of religious education. With a career in RE teaching in my sights when I read it at age 20, I thought that what the world primarily needed was less ignorance about different religious traditions. I was probably right, but my plan was that I would ‘tell’ pupils what (I thought) religious people did and believed, and somehow peace Continue reading